Remove clutter: empty the spaces beneath your bathroom and kitchen sinks and move any belongings that block access to your water heater or other appliances.
Get your paperwork together:  file with documentation of all maintenance and repairs you’ve done on your home, including annual or semi-annual furnance inspections, receipts for roof or chimney repairs and other inspections. If you’ve had an insurance claim on your house, keep those papers together, too, so you can prove that you took care of the problem.
Provide complete access to your home: unlock gates and doors to a shed or garage that don’t have lockbox access. Move anything that’s blocking entrances to the attic, basement or storage spaces.
Leave home: Inspectors find it easier to do their work without the presence of the homeowners and, even more important, without your pets and children around.
Clean your house: a clean home gives the impression that you take care of your property and so the inspector shouldn’t expect to find as many problems.
Leave the lights on: Make sure light bulbs work, especially in storage spaces or areas you don’t often use.